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The art of selective translations

Love: proof is in the power bill

Love letters and other poorly written correspondence may be used as evidence of a long-standing relationship… but in the eyes of the authorities, as far as proof of love goes, nothing beats a good power bill. Continue reading “Love: proof is in the power bill”

Princess Charlotte’s very posh birth certificate

Most of you will be aware of it: on 2 May 2015, the Duchess of Cambridge gave birth to the newest member of the British royal family, Princess Charlotte. True to tradition, we will use her birth certificate, released on Twitter on 6 May 2015, to illustrate how to carry out a perfect selective translation of birth details.

Princess Charlotte's birth certificateSelective translations are a very specific type of translations that the Translation Service offers to individuals wishing to submit an application to Citizenship or Immigration in New Zealand. The process involves extracting information from original documents and completing standard forms which were developed in consultation with New Zealand citizenship and immigration authorities. Click find out about the selective translation of Princess Charlottes’s very posh birth certificate.

This sample selective translation is part of a series designed to illustrate our guidelines and help you improve your selective translations. Two e-learning modules on this topic are also freely available:

We hope you enjoy these mock translations as much as we enjoy making them.

Disclaimer: Princess Charlotte and/or her parents are not considering moving to New Zealand. If they did, they wouldn’t need apply for a visa or citizenship.

Got a criminal record… and an Apostille?

Confusion recently arose because of an Apostille: we sent a file for selective translation to one of our regular freelance translators, but it contained two pages – the first page was an Apostille, the second a birth certificate. Since our guidelines for selective translations don’t mention Apostilles, the translator was slightly confused and decided to carry out a time-consuming full translation of the two pages.

To prevent this from happening again, and to kill two birds with one stone, this month’s post on the art of selective translations deals with a certificate of no criminal record attached to an Apostille. You will find out how to fill out our Certificate of No Criminal Record template and what to do if the document you’re translating is attached to an Apostille. Please note that we can only use this template for clean criminal records. If a conviction is listed, a full translation will be required. Click to learn about the selective translation of an Apostilled certificate of no criminal record. Also, if you are confused about the assignment we’ve sent you, please contact us to clarify the situation before undertaking any translation work.

These sample selective translations are here to illustrate our guidelines and help you improve your selective translations. We hope you enjoy these mock translations as much as we enjoy making them.

For more information on Apostilles please read this blog post or go to the Authentication Unit’s website.

Disclaimer: The Ministry of Naughty People and the Centre for Disciplinary Action and Naughtiness Prevention do not exist.

Doris’s birth certificate

This month, we go back to basics. Our source document is a New Zealand birth certificate issued in 1993 and related to someone who was born in 1896. The point we’d like to make is that formatting matters. Our guidelines for selective translations include formatting issues such as using upper and lower cases, font size and format etc. So if you don’t have them, request a copy. Click the image to find out more, and please remember: never change the template.

Birth details – Doris Moss

These sample selective translations are here to illustrate our guidelines and help you improve your selective translations. We hope you enjoy these mock translations as much as we enjoy making them. Feel free to send any comments or questions or to request a specific template to be highlighted.

Stefan

Disclaimer: This mock selective translation is not an actual translation requested by Doris Moss’s descendants.

Mrs. Obama’s divorce decree

In this issue of our newsletter, we tackle our Divorce Details template. Source documents come in all sorts and shapes. We get divorce certificates, decrees of divorce, divorce rulings etc. Some contain more information than others, but as usual, our guidelines for selective translations apply. If you don’t have them, request a copy. This month we imagine that Barack Obama’s mother applied to immigrate to New Zealand, and had to prove her marital status. Click the image to find out more.

Selective translation of a divorce decree

These sample selective translations are here to illustrate our guidelines and help you improve your selective translations. We hope you enjoy these mock translations as much as we enjoy making them. Feel free to send any comments or questions or to request a specific template to be highlighted.

Stefan

Disclaimer: This mock selective translation is not an actual translation requested by Mrs. Obama. She did not apply to immigrate to New Zealand and that was probably a good idea, as her son is now president of the United States.

Declan and Lola’s tenancy agreement

This April, we take another look at our Social Footprint template. It is by far our most versatile template as it can be used for a range of documents depending on the purpose of the translation. Declan and Lola requested a translation of their tenancy agreement in London to show that they have been living together for a while and that their relationship is genuine. Alfonso suggested a selective translation to keep our fees down which made the Heaveys very happy. As usual, our guidelines for selective translations apply. If you don’t have them, request a copy. In the meantime, click the image to find out more.

Tenancy agreement – Heavey

These sample selective translations are here to illustrate our guidelines and help you improve your selective translations. We hope you enjoy these mock translations as much as we enjoy making them. Feel free to send any comments or questions or to request a specific template to be highlighted.

Stefan

Disclaimer: This mock selective translation is not an actual translation requested by Declan and Lola HEAVEY. We have no idea who they are and whether they ever considered migrating to New Zealand.

Sookie was adopted

Copy of Sookee's custody certificateThis month we look at our custody document template. We usually use it to prove that our client, who may be applying for a visa or citizenship, has custody over a child. This is a sensitive area as laws around custody and adoption vary from country to country. When filling out the template we need to make sure that it reflects exactly all the information contained in the original document. That may require explaining any legal differences. If there is any doubt, the Immigration or Citizenship officer will request a full translation of the source document. As usual, our guidelines for selectivetranslations apply. If you don’t have them, request a copy. Click the image to find out more.

Custody document – Sookee Stackhouse

These sample selective translations are here to illustrate our guidelines and help you improve your selective translations. We hope you enjoy these mock translations as much as we enjoy making them. Feel free to send any comments or questions or to request a specific template to be highlighted.

Stefan

Disclaimer: This mock selective translation is not an actual translation requested by Andrew Bellefleur. He never adopted Sookie Stackhouse.

Benjamin Baker’s driver’s licence

Front of a driver's licenceBack of a driver's licenceThis month we look at our driver’s licence template. Our clients who request them are almost all tourists travelling around New Zealand. They want their translations fast and accurate, so there’s no room for error. But driver’s licences are slightly trickier to translate, especially since the requirements are quite different from those for selective translations being submitted to Citizenship or Immigration New Zealand. For example, there’s no need to capitalise the holder’s surname, but you still need to use square brackets. Click the image to find out more.

Selective translation of Driver’s licence

These sample selective translations are here to illustrate our guidelines and help you improve your selective translations. We hope you enjoy these mock translations as much as we enjoy making them. Feel free to send any comments or questions or to request a specific template to be highlighted.

Stefan

Disclaimer: This mock selective translation is not an actual translation requested by Benjamin Baker.

Cicely’s identity card

The Internet is a treasure trove of historical documents, which give us insight into the lives and worries of the past. While those of Anglo-Saxon culture might now object to having national identity cards, the United Kingdom introduced compulsory national registration and national identity cards in 1939 as an emergency measure at the start of World War II. Our selective translation of the month tackles one of these cards issued in 1949, and uses the Citizenship Document template to do so. As you will see, the translation of identity cards is not always straightforward, but hopefully this will give you some insight as to best practice when filling out our templates. Beware however that identity documents such as this one may be used to fill out the Citizenship Document template, as well as the Birth Details template if that is what Immigration or Citizenship needs. They may wish to use the document to verify the applicant’s citizenship or his/her birth details (the latter being a lot more common). In case of doubt, ask us! Click the image to find out more.

Citizenship document – Gibson

The sample selective translations of this series are here to illustrate our guidelines and help you improve your selective translations. We hope you enjoy these mock translations as much as we enjoy doing them. Feel free to send your comments and questions.

S.G.

Disclaimer: This mock selective translation wasn’t requested by Immigration NZ or Citizenship.

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